In season – November

In-Season

Pumpkins and Halloween have been and gone and Bonfire Night is welcomed with warm soup and hearty dishes. The wintry root veggies are here to accompany the Sunday roasts with rich game meats. Check out our ‘In Season’ Pintrest board to see what takes your fancy.

What’s in season throughout November?

Fruit and Veg
Apples
Aubergines
Raspberries
Beetroot
Brussels sprouts
Cabbages
Carrots
Celeriac
Celery
Chestnuts
Chichory
Hazelnuts
Jerusalem artichockes
Kale
Leeks
Parsnips
Pears
Potatoes
Pumpkins
Quince
Shallots
Sloe
Spinach
Swedes
Swiss Chard
Turnips
Walnuts
Wild mushrooms

Fish & seafood
Mackerel
Mussels
Oysters
Plaice
Squid
Whiting

Meat & game
Goose
Grouse
Lamb
Partridge
Pheasant
Rabbit
Turkey
Venison
Wild duck
Wood pigeon

Celeriac

celeriac

Celeriac is a type of celery that has been cultivated for its root and therefore termed a root vegetable. It can be used as an alternative to potato. It’s sweeter than celery, has a slight apple flavour and considering it is so widely available, it is very underused and very versatile.

Best use: Roast with rosemary, puree, crush or mash, make into soup.

Works well in roasts instead of carrots and suede, or roughly dice and braise with onion and bacon. If you roast celeriac it concentrates the sugars and caramelises nicely. Or use raw grated in salad

Perfect match: Celeriac and apple soup, chicken and game.

Chicory

chicory

Chicory is a bitter leaf lettuce. It adds texture and flavour to winter salads. It has a strong flavour that will stand up to bold ingredients.

Braise and use instead of vegetables. Cook with a small amount of liquid in the pan with butter, sugar, orange juice and orange zest. Cover with grease proof paper and the juice will come out of the chichory.

Perfect match: Duck, makerel, trout, turbot and brill

Kale

kale

Kale is a member of the cabbage family, along with cavolo nero and purple Russian. It is very good for you as it’s full or iron and very colourful. It becomes sweeter after a frost.

Blanche (pre cook) in boiling salted water, then refresh (iced water) to keep the colour. Toss in oil and garlic to finish. Or braise with onion, garlic and olive oil.

Perfect match: Game, venison, duck, chicken and Sunday roasts.

Kale is very forgiving, cook it until its soft. Difficult to overcook although it will loose its looks.

Top tip: Add flavour to it. Toss with oil and other herbs.

If you cant find kale use savoy cabbage or Swiss chard.

Turnips

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Whats the difference between turnips and suedes? Turnips are smaller and with whiter flesh whilst the swede has a yellow flesh and is a lot larger. In Scotland swedes are called turnips (neeps) but it’s technically wrong.

Turnips are good for roasting, purees and pickling on salads.

Perfect match: Lamb, mutton, venison

Small turnips – Blanche first for 90 seconds and then the outer skin will rub off, then roast.

Big turnips – Roast and mash.

Venison

deer

Venison has less cholesterol and fat than beef which makes it a very healthy substitute. It doesn’t taste gamey providing it isn’t hung very long. The longer its hung (2/3 weeks), the stronger the flavour.

Good cut: Haunch (back legs) – Good flavour as the muscles are being used a lot. It’s a cheaper than loin or fillet. The butcher will prepare for you do that you can use it as an alternative to beef.

Sometimes fishmongers sell game due to their licence so it is always worth asking.

Top tip: Needs to be medium rare or else it will dry out due to the lack of fat.

Perfect match: Sweet things like fruits (roasted), pear and damsons which balance the acidity, root vegetables, bacon and sprouts.

Try out chef’s venison stroganoff recipe.

We think seasonality is really important for sustainability and great tasting food. Each month we put together a series of hints and tips, maybe a few recipes, focusing around what you should be cooking and eating in that month.

Check out October’s hints and tips. Please don’t forget to send us your suggestions and we will include them in our blog post.

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